Tag Archives: Julian Assange

Edward Snowden whereabouts unknown as US presses Russia – as it happened


English: Moscow, the Kremlin. Cathedral Square
English: Moscow, the Kremlin. Cathedral Square (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
English: Embassy of the Russia Federation in H...
English: Embassy of the Russia Federation in Havana Español: Embajada de la Federación de Rusia en La Habana Français : Ambassade de la fédération de Russie à la Havane (Cuba). Русский: Посольство Российской Федерации в Гаване (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
English: Moscow-city 2010,March
English: Moscow-city 2010,March (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Edward Snowden is expected to catch a plane today from Moscow to Cuba as he attempts to reach Ecuador and evade US attempts to have him extradited and tried on espionage charges.

Snowden – the former NSA contractor whose leaks to the Guardian about US intelligence programmes have caused controversy around the world – yesterday fled Hong Kong for Moscow after the authorities in the Chinese province said Washington’s provisional warrant did not fully comply with legal requirements. He had travelled to Hong Kong on 20 May as a base from which to reveal his secrets and his identity.

A representative of Russia’s Aeroflot airline told the Associated Press that Snowden registered for the flight to Havana that leaves Moscow today at 2.05pm (11.05am BST). He is expected to then leave Havana for Ecuador – the country that has granted asylum to Wikileaks founder Julian Assange at its embassy in London.

The airline says he registered for the flight on Sunday using his US passport – which American officials say has been annulled as part of an effort to prosecute him for revealing the highly classified government secrets.

Ecuador’s foreign minister said Sunday that Quito is considering his application for asylum.

We’ll have live coverage of all the latest developments here throughout the day.
Miriam Elder is at the airport in Moscow about to get on what we hope is the same plane to Havana as Edward Snowden. She told me:

As far as we know he’s expected to get on this flight to Havana in two hours, around 2pm Moscow time. There is speculation that maybe all this information that he’ll be on it is a ruse, but there’s a whole lot of journalists here taking the chance that he’ll be on that flight.

I asked her what the reaction had been in Russia to Snowden’s sudden arrival in Moscow yesterday.

It’s obviously been huge. It’s been a really big story. The airport has been crawling both with international journalists and Russian journalists … We haven’t had any really huge statements from Russian officials; Putin hasn’t commented on it. The foreign ministry, last I checked, just said they were looking into what his plans are.

And you’ve had a lot of Russian MPs calling for him to stay here and all I can say, being at the airport until 1am last night, is that there were Russian undercover agents all over the terminal where we believed him to be. It was really clear that the Russians were in charge of the situation here. There were Ecuadorian diplomats milling around trying to get to talk to him but the Russians seemed to be controlling everything here.

Miriam reiterated that there had been no confirmation of American speculation that the countries allowing Snowden to visit were getting information from him in exchange, but she said: “I would expect that Russian officials would be very eager to talk to him. And not only to talk to him to get information from him, but I suspect maybe to try to get him to stay here. Again, there’s no confirmation of that at all.”

She added that Dmitry Peskov, the Kremlin spokesman, had repeated to her that Moscow would consider any asylum request from Snowden.

I talked to Peskov yesterday morning and he said yes. I said, ‘Would you consider an asylum request from him?’ and he said, ‘Yes, that’s just standard procedure. That’s what we do for every application that we get.’

Elsewhere Peskov said the Kremlin was unaware of any contact between Snowden and the Russian authorities.

Miriam has tweeted a picture of the plane.

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Ecuador says it has received asylum request from Snowden


Ecuador
Ecuador (Photo credit: OEA – OAS)
Julian Assange, from Wikileaks, at the SKUP co...
Julian Assange, from Wikileaks, at the SKUP conference for investigative journalism, Norway, March 2010 (see http://www.skup.no/Info_in_Englishhttp://www.skup.no/Konferansen_2010/Programmet) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Ecuador's president-elect Rafael Correa.
Ecuador’s president-elect Rafael Correa. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ecuadorean Foreign Minister Ricardo Patino said on Sunday that former U.S. National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden had asked Ecuador for asylum.

“The Government of Ecuador has received an asylum request from Edward J. #Snowden,” Patino, who is on an official visit to Vietnam, said on Twitter.

Patino did not give additional details.

WikiLeaks spokesman Kristinn Hrafnsson confirmed that Snowden had requested asylum in Ecuador. The anti-secrecy website had earlier said it helped Snowden find “political asylum in a democratic country”.

Ecuador has given political asylum to the founder of WikiLeaks, Julian Assange, who has spent more than a year holed up at Ecuador’s embassy in London.

Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa has said Assange is right to fear he might be sent from Sweden, where he is accused of sexual assault, to the United States to face charges over WikiLeaks’ publication in 2010 of secret U.S. cables.

NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden ‘requests asylum in Ecuador’


Seal of the United States Department of Justice
Seal of the United States Department of Justice (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower who revealed the existence of a wide-ranging US online surveillance program, has requested asylum from Ecuador, the government’s foreign minister has announced.

Snowden arrived in Moscow earlier today after leaving Hong Kong, where he had sought refuge from US charges of espionage and theft, following White House confirmation that the US had begun the extradition process with the city’s semi-autonomous government.

Aboard Aeroflot flight SU213, Snowden landed in the Russian capital just after 5pm local time with a companion from online activist group Wikileaks, who helped the former intelligence officer leave China.

It is believed that Snowden will tomorrow travel from Moscow to a final destination that is yet to be disclosed. However, according to Ecuadorian foreign minister Ricardo Patiño Aroca, he has now filed a formal bid for protection from the Latin American country.

Wikileaks founder Julian Assange has claimed his organisation helped Snowden leave Hong Kong in search of “political asylum in a democratic country,” but did not specify his target nation.

Assange, who has himself been avoiding extradition in the Ecuadorian embassy in London for over a year, told The Sydney Morning Herald: “He will be met by diplomats from the country that will be his ultimate destination. Diplomats from that country will accompany him on a further flight to his destination.”

He added: “Owing to WikiLeaks‘ own circumstances, we have developed significant expertise in international asylum and extradition law, associated diplomacy and the practicalities in these matters. I have great personal sympathy for Ed Snowden’s position.”

A statement from the Hong Kong government confirmed that Snowden left the Chinese city to a third country this morning, adding: “The United States previously requested Hong Kong to issue a provisional arrest warrant for Mr Snowden.

“Because the US request failed to fully comply with the requirements under Hong Kong law, the US Department of Justice was asked to provide further information. The failure to provide sufficient information in this case meant there was no legal basis to restrict Mr Snowden’s departure.”

In response, the US Department of Justice said they would continue to seek extradition elsewhere. “We have been informed by the Hong Kong authorities Mr Snowden has departed for a third country,” a spokeswoman said. “We will continue to discuss this mater with Hong Kong and pursue relevant law enforcement cooperation with other countries where Mr Snowden may be attempting to travel.”

Speculation surrounding Snowden’s plans has continued throughout the day with possible final destinations being named in reports as Venezuela, Iceland, Cuba and Ecuador.

Russia’s Interfax news agency quoted a source at the Aeroflot airline as saying there is a ticket in Snowden’s name for an onward flight to Cuba that leaves tomorrow and a subsequent booking on a local flight to Caracas, Venezuela.

The source added that Snowden did not have a Russian visa and would therefore wait for his connecting flight in the airport’s transit area. “In this case, he will not need to pass border control. Thus, the law enforcement agencies of our country will not be able to stop him,” the source reportedly said.

However, an embassy vehicle carrying the Ecuadorian ambassador to Russia was photographed arriving at Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport shortly after Snowden landed.

Speaking with The Guardian, Ambassador Patricio Chavez said he had not spoken with Snowden, did not know where he was and would not confirm whether he had been seen by Ecuadorian officials. Asked why he was there, Chavez reportedly said: “We have an interest in knowing what is happening to him.”

A spokesman for Russian president Vladimir Putin said they were unaware of Snowden’s location or plans, but US politicians have hit out at the former Cold War enemy for not already intervening on their behalf.

Democratic Senator Chuck Schumer told CNN: “Allies are supposed to treat each other in decent ways, and Putin always seems almost eager to put a finger in the eye of the United States, whether it is Syria, Iran and now, of course, with Snowden. I think it’ll have serious consequences for the United States-Russia relationship.”

The news comes amid new allegations by Snowden that the NSA ‘prism’ program was used to hack Chinese mobile phone data, which could have impacted on China’s compliance with extradition proceedings.

An editorial in China’s official state news agency, which is believed to represent the government’s feelings, labelled the US a “villain” and demanded an explanation of its activities.

The Xinhua statement said: “These, along with previous allegations, are clearly troubling signs. They demonstrate that the United States, which has long been trying to play innocent as a victim of cyber-attacks, has turned out to be the biggest villain in our age.”

British Police.


British Police..

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The most popular politician on earth.


How often do we look back throughtout the universe, say from country to country at their down to earth leaders and think, why can’t our leader be or perform like to name but a few  upstanding politician’s.

Mandela did great things in his time, even though he’s been let down by his counterpath. Lula the Brazilian president who is now stepping down. He gain the trustworthyness of his country by mingleing and listening to the poorest , knowing what and how to handle a situation fron within the poorest end of his country and not the rich as our government often seem to tread.

I do wished that these morans would take the tip and use a leaf from those guys book.